Monday, May 22, 2017

Doctor Dude Presents ... What Is God? An Introductory Guide for Young Free-Thinkers by Bryce Dodson

I was compensated via Fiverr for sharing this post. I only share those books which I think my readers might find interesting.

What Is God?

Abigail is a curious young lady who attends church for the first time. She has lots of questions, but her mom doesn't know how to respond. Luckily, Doctor Dude and his sidekick dog Dawnie come to the rescue!

"Doctor Dude" was written as a tool for parents raising their children as secular in a religious world. The book acquaints the budding reader with the roots of the deity from the Old Testament. In addition, Doctor Dude introduces the fundamental scientific theories, such as the Big Bang and Evolution, in simple to understand language for the young skeptic in your family. The brilliant illustrations will captivate readers of all ages.

Buy links

About Bryce Dodson

Bryce Dodson is a first-time author, transitioning from a 9-to-5 job in the tech sector to penning children's books. He was inspired to write "What is God?" from his own experience with religion and the growing demographic of the "Nones."

Bryce has a BS in Biology and an MA in Education, and wants to share his love of the sciences to the up-and-coming generation of skeptics. He lives in the small California town of Mammoth Lakes.

Facebook Page:

Sunday, May 21, 2017

What Is a Tesseract? and Other Scientific Stuff by Rebecca Rose Orton

I was compensated via Fiverr for sharing this post. I only share those books that I think my readers will find interesting.

What Is a Tesseract?

This children's book, What is a Tesseract? And Other Scientific Stuff With Color Illustrations explains the features of a tesseract, wheels within wheels, and a sphere within a sphere all within the context of dimensions. Explore the 0th-4th dimensions with their unique points of view. Imagine what it would be like to exist in each dimension. What can you do? Where can you go? What shapes can exist? Ultimately, answering these questions can lead to a discovery of scientific concepts beyond the daily reality and above the mundane routines of life. This book is targeted for children in upper elementary grades who haven’t taken any geometry classes at school yet. The exposure to geometric concepts in this book is intended to help children get a head start on some vocabulary words and to be ready for geometry class when they do get registered for it. There is an intuitive element to the drawings where children might understand in a scaffolding manner how dimensions work. The illustrated suns are intended to draw out that intuition and show where directions go in each dimension.

Buy links

About Rebecca Rose Orton

I first discovered the world of books at the bookmobile, which parked only a block or so down the street from my home at the Catholic School playground. I started with comic books of cute characters like Mickey Mouse and Daffy Duck and studiously avoided the comics geared towards action adventure. After running out of those comics to read, I looked high and low all around the bookmobile for something to read. I found the Hardy Boys series and read book after book of this series. After consuming those novels, I complained that the bookmobile didn't have anything more to offer me. My mother told me that there was a library at my school. I was flabbergasted! I didn't know that! I started reading books voraciously at the school library. I remember reading J. R. Tolkien's books there. I was in fifth grade at the time. My grandmother told me that reading saved me, a deaf student, from a tedious, ignorant, and mundane fate in the mainstreamed educational track. In junior high school, my reading skills expanded. I still remember reading my first science fiction book there about a space cadet who had photographic memory. In one English class, I read the entire textbook full of short stories before the first week was out and spent the most of the semester immediately writing out answers to a handout full of questions about each short story because I didn't need to read the short story first during class. Needless to say, I needed to be in a more advanced English class and they placed me in a grammar class where I learned all about grammar from a little red textbook. Most of these lessons stuck with me even to this day. I also remember desperately wanting to buy Trixie Belden books at K-Mart and even tried to read a few chapters while standing in the shopping aisle. At the high school library, I explored other genres such as fairy tales, mythology, new age, etc. Even the people in my life introduced me to new genres. My mother introduced me to psychology books and my best friend introduced romance books to me. In addition, I went to the local public libraries to find more books to read during the summer time and this was where I discovered Star Trek novels and became a Trekkie. At one point, I kept track of the books I read in a year on paper and it listed over a hundred titles. I was proud to have read so many books. They opened an entirely new and completely accessible world to me. I could understand them clearly and books did not get annoyed when I need something repeated back to me because I didn't understand them the first time. Books were wonderful!